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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
've got a very positive environment given all the other good things that have been said over and above that, that if we go over the cliff, if there's a real possibility, then we'll see consumer incomes go down and like i said earnings expectations are likely to be revised lower, so what do we like fundamentally? >> pretty defensive areas in many cases there? >> i would say that -- >> thank you. we've got to go, guys. thank you for your thoughts and ideas today on our beloved fiscal cliff. >> five days to go and counting before we fall off the so-called fiscal cliff and while there's no deal, more news out of washington and our very own john harwood is there. >> reporter: mandy, we've got a letter from the republican leadership to the president and to the democrats in the senate saying that the house has acted, they passed legislation last year to extend all the tax cuts and to shift the scheduled sequester cuts from defense to domestic programs, but, of course, in urging the senate to act saying, well, we've acted, now it's your turn, we're simply not going to see the democrats take th
parents more choices to put their children in an environment that they can succeed. it's an idea that works. we can look around the country at states that try to create a more business-friendly environment, not because they're for businesses or for any political reason or they're for special interests, but they know the only way to get jobs and prosperity and create opportunity is to create an environment where businesses can thrive. we make it political here. and we ask our constituents to make choices between employers and employees. but states like texas have created a business-friendly environment with lower taxes and less regulation. they've passed some laws that reduce the risk of just frivolous lawsuits. and what they've seen is businesses moving to their state. they've seen jobs and opportunity created not for the top 2%, but expanding a middle class, creating more opportunities and more tax revenues to do the things at the state government level that we all want for everyone that lives there. this is not for a few. this is for 100%. and you see specials now on tv compari
. and last time i worked in they wanted to work with the employees . happy employees help the environment of a workplace. yoining that managers are going to look for the most practicing catholics and christians and ask them to work a double. there is eye lot of young people who look forward to presents and time and a half. a lot of people who work in mcdonalds who are not having practicing catholics and chstians i don't think it is as extreme. managers looking for catholic to force them to work. >> also wayne, i have to go back to this change in the culture that we are seeing with all of the companies now andtrawns wanting to open on what really are national holidays to tracey's point. >> and li i don't think it is it either necessarily a religious economy or economic question. it is a question as you pointed out. if the workers decide it is not shove down their throat. if they take a voit and 15 and 12 of them say we would not to close. >> otherwise. you shoving it or have a facist government where oh, you have to work . we'll pie you. that's not right. >> john, you have the last word. a
. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: yeah. catherine, let me ask you, when i look what happened in this case of darden because it seems like something that has happened to a bunch of different companies, my takeaway at the end of the day for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need is jobs, jobs, jobs. and there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what is going to happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations and we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: but, jamie, don't you thi
a plausible story. president know about that decreasing security environment? was he told about the attacks on the conflict of which he told about the 16 august cable where the investor said if he is attacked we cannot defend this place. what did the president know about the security environment in libya before the attack? during the attack, what orders did they make, why were they not carried out? and afterward, why did he pushed a story line that was misleading? as to ambassador rice, after this report, i hope the american people will understand that the story she told on 15 september was completely out of line with reality on the ground, and i believe firmly now more than ever that the story she told on five national television shows was more of a political story than informing the american people. the talking points -- who changed the talking points? he took out references to al qaeda? al qaeda references are all over the rim original report and all over the cables coming out of libya and tripoli. when she said security at the consulate was substantial, and strong, that was the furthest
watch your backstop, in anyone this your environment, before you fire at anybody. and so, every police officer, just because we wear a badge, we're not superheroes. it takes discipline and it takes training and then you expect, in a crisis, that we can perform at least to the levels that we've trained at. >> well, that's the hope. sheriff one final thing for you. i want to read you a quote, republican president dwight eisenhower who said back in 1957, "it will be a sad day for this country if children can safely attend their classes only under the protection of armed guards." what does that voice from the past say to you about today's america and your proposal? >> well, circumstances -- circumstances certainly have changed. do i want to see a teacher or a principal be armed? i don't. but this is a circumstance and the threat that we're presented with today. the same way, would we ever imagine asking pilots who are charged with this awesome responsibility of flying an aircraft, and yet here today, because i fly armed, i have to meet the pilots, and they say, sheriff, i'm armed. the othe
to make for a much safer environment. we've got new signage and pavement markings to make that clear. as everybody was stuck on the subway, i rode my bike yesterday and rode passed it. it's a significant safety improvement, not bust for cyclists, but for f line operators. it's a very busy area. we have 120 people -- it's about a third of the left turns off of market street during rush hour, our cyclists. so, they're taking a whole lot of vehicles off the road by being on their bikes. this will enable them to do so safety and connective. we have the greenway signal times for bicycle speed. so, small but significant safety improvement there. moving on to parking, last thursday we met with residents and merchants in the northeast mission area. you may recall, i guess it was earlier this year, we rolled out coined of a large parking management strategy covering a large area including potrero hill and dogpatch and mission bay. we got pretty significant feedback and it was not positive feedback in terms of our plan and process. so, as we saw to you at the time, we kind of stepped back, we
the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the
to an inappropriate situation in a workplace that created an uncomfortable environment for the woman, we don't want to set that standard in iowa. >> how is it uncomfortable for her. >> talking about a bulge in his pants. >> she was texting with him, and they are married. >> they were not sexual in context, hers were not, but his were, they are clear, her text-messages are family oriented, and please stop talking about the other issues. >> she told him, she was not having sex on a regular basis. >> he assumed that. >> no she told him. tom: i text my coworkers all of the time. >> your coworkers or employees. s. >> she was his -- >> 10 years, what happened all of a sudden? >> a whole constitutional law created about discrimination in the work place, he was the employer. >> the iowa supreme court got it wrong? >> yes. >> i don't think they did. >> i will say it over, and over, iowa am ba embarrassed. >> you can say it, but that does not make it right. >> highway patrol government stays out of -- i hope the government stays out of the workplace, hire who you want. tom: look out beautiful people. it is -
station. >>guest: a nice environment, which is conducive to creation of new products and new companies, and we like to copy that model on our vessel. >> you cam up with this idea after graduate school? >>guest: when i was in graduate school i got my mba from the university of miami and many people from all ports of the world, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies th them. >> so they get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: we would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new jobs. and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self sponsor and you cannot be here
there ♪ ♪ hey ♪ it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management ♪ >> welcome back, time for news by the numbers. 22,000 how many job applications delta received for just 300 flight attendants jobs. officials say they received two applications every minute after posting the position online. bye-bye. 48 years how long they thought they were married before they found out the marriage was never legal. they just made the marriage legal after the license was never turned in after their wedding. i wonder whose fault that was, left it on the mantle. finally, 100 the number of cities vying for the best city for men, ratio men to women and other factors and accord to go men's health, raleigh north carolina is the winner, so, single men go down there. kelly. >> kelly: i used to live in raleigh. more and more kids are smoking pot than ever before and a ne
and sophisticated urban environment that would have brought with it all of the diversity of... of the roman empire, and would have required, just to get on, you know, as the price of doing business, a level of sophistication that one would not have thought characteristic of jesus, the humble carpenter. >> narrato scholars today question the image of jesus the humble carpenter, and disagree about his social class. >> ( dramatized ): they were astounded, and said "where did this man get this wisdom? is not this the carpenter's son?" >> the difficulty for us in hearing a term like "carpenter" is that we immediately think of a highly skilled worker, and, at least in north america, in the middle class, making a very high income. as soon as we take that into the ancient world, we are totally lost, because, first of all, there was no middle class in the ancient world. there were the "haves" and the "have nots," to put it very simply. and in the anthropology of peasant societies, to say that somebody is an artisan or a carpenter is not to compliment them. it is to say that they are lower in the pecking or
and see global environment. >> should unions get with it the fact we don't have living wages in the united states and corporations have so much power they're overriding --. neil: what about nonunion counterparts who go through the same stuff every day. >> they do and a shame they're not unionized because union wages are 28% higher. everyone should be in a union. the fact we lost sight of that. neil: why don't you think they are? maybe because they can't be a of forded? >> i think corporations have run a campaign f the last 40 years that have demonized unions and when you talk about unions we're talking about average workers. we'rr talking about your neighbors. we're talking about, you know, maybe people who are watching this. we're not talking about some amorphous group of thugs as they have often been characrized. neil: i don't think we have to talk about amorphous group of thugs. we have to talk about money in, money out. a lot of compani can't afford them. they look always for the place where capital will be least risked. >> i thinkthat companies try to make goods in the mo productive w
with other guests as well, that talked about the merger and acquisition environment. it is a glaring lack of activity. i don't want to make too much of it, take a look. you can see how they've done this year. in line with 2010. up ever so slightly from 2011. remember, we have record low borrowing rates in the high yield market, not to mention from banks as well. leverage ratios have crept up, so you can get debt that equals 5.5, or 6, or even more times the company you're acquiring. all of that would argue for more activity on the part of the leverage buyers. we've had jim woolery at jpmorgan saying, yeah, i can cut you a $10 million check. we haven't seen the big deals. one reason, simply put, flow begets flow. when there's a lot of activity, you get even more. there is a company looking to be shed of this business, or achoirs another business, they may look to shed another business as well. that might be an audience that private equity is part of. when you aren't having that level of activity, you may not get even more from the lbo. but something we've run up against lately does seem to
by people. >> is there still a shot for consolidation in this world, in this environment, or in this sort of post too big to fail world nobody wants to try? >> there will be consolidation. when people start getting used to the prices that these places are worth. i mean remember that bank stock investors were used to seeing their institutions get bought and sold at significant multiples of book value. the returns that are coming out of banks today don't justify that kind of price. so when people start getting comfortable with what these institutions are worth they can only earn 8% or 9% on capital and 1% on -- >> we had an analyst on yesterday or the day before who said that the big winner in 2013 among the big banks was going to be jpmorgan. but that the big loser was going to be morgan stanley. do you buy that? >> no. i'm not sure that it's possible to predict that since the new year hasn't even started yet. the idea that jpmorgan could be the big winner, of course it's possible. but jpmorgan is so large and complex i'm not sure that it's possible to make that kind of prediction. >> what
tax environment. for instance, i don't think an investor would say, i'm going to shun higher dividend stocks, because now my tax rate is up. unfortunately, it will be higher, but you still will pursue dividend stocks. >> got it. peter. thank you. happy new year to you. peter anderson of asset management. >>> still ahead, the head of the campaign to fix the debt joins us live. what needs to happen so we can get a deal done and can it done at this meeting the today? also ahead, we're live from the port area of bay young, new jersey, with an update on a possible strike that could affect businesses from texas to massachusetts. also got the houston mayor to tell us how her city is preparing for a strike. futures still a little jittery here this morning. dow down 86. "squawk on the street" back in a minute. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. >> for me is doesn't get any better than this. an early christmas surprise as a military wife arrives at the airport to pick up a family member, but is instead greeted by her soldier husband, bryan puccell. he was in afghanistan and she had no idea he was coming home. he was trying to get home to oregon at the height of the the christmas travel, it was a nightmare. but nothing could stop him from seeing his wife and one-year-old daughter. kiss-kiss. ♪ >> in today's beyond the dream. we take you live to nashville, tennessee, the music capital of the world, a very special concert featuring some of the top stars i
well-staffed, would be the safest, most secure environment for them. >> reporter: it all began back on september 26th when a parent reported misconduct. the army quickly reviewed surveillance video and found several young children, all under the age of 5, were physically abused. charges of simple assault were filed. but parents were still in the dark. two days later, on september 28th, they are hand adler saying -- they are handed a letter saying only that there is a report of alleged mistreatment and inappropriate behavior by staff. >> all along, this first week when we were being sort of given piecemeal information, denied access to the videotapes, we were also being asked if we wanted to seek medical care for our child. >> reporter: medical care for what? >> for what? obviously we wanted to understand and see with our own eyes, since that evidence was available. >> reporter: she was horrified when she finally saw the surveillance tape of her child. >> obviously you don't ever want to see your child subjected to that kind of assault. these were the caregivers we entrusted them to
was raised in a pretty strong faith environment with my family. and i certainly had this at my school. and i don't disagree with you. i think it's all sorts of things, larry. it's the lack of parental guidance, as well. i think it's the breakdown of the social fabric of the family in america and many other countries. but the particular problem for america, which no other country that has the video -- britain has mental health issues, britain has the same videos, the same hollywood movies, britain has all the social problems that america has albeit on a smaller scale. the one thing we don't have is guns. there are no assault weapons allowed for civilians. and guess what? we don't get mass shootings ever. >> you're not against handguns or rifles. >> no, absolutely not. and i fully respect the second amendment and the right to bear arms and defend yourselves. if a father or mother in a house wants to have a handgun or a pistol to defend themselves against an intruder, that is fine by me. i respect your second amendment, but nobody can tell me you need these assault weapons with 100 bullets in a
made the trains run on time. that was the environment that i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill i asked me to finish the book. again, silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it was hubris or not -- >> what do you think he saw i knew that he had not seen in any of the other possible writers? >> we did talk about that. he told me once -- he said, try to find someone. he said, this is like a mother giving away her children to be raised by another. i would say, bill. he would say, nice try, but no. he said "if i wanted anyone, and i do not, i would want a writer." later, when he last, he said "paul, you have written 500, 600 feature stories. that is where i started." he saw the journalists as having the same tools as the historian when it comes to sourcing. when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test, i call it, a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. and i guess he liked my stories. >> so, if you had to pick out of this book your favorite story, what would they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to
, of the environment and i think of andy's work in that way, of his experience. we're both from pennsylvania so i always -- i feel a sense of that. but, you know, when i think of the work, again, it's a complete kind of externalization and of playing very god like situation. playing the creator of -- you can multiply, you can procreate image after image and at the same time you can have aspects of how we interpret images of perfection, defined images into abstraction of life and death. so they're so rich, the whole aspect of what it means to be alive and a sense of our parameters that might take place in drama in this work. >> rose: this is? >> well, this is disaster painting. warhol did a number of these orange disaster and it's an electric chair. in 1963 he was preparing for an exhibition in paris and he said "i'm going to call this show "death in america." but the image of death, the electric chair, is made kind of pretty in these electric chairs but i think there's so much conflict or complexity to the prettiness of warhol's banality. i think banality is really i sort of hinted at. i think th
a tougher business environment in the new year? we will break it down next. and then the impact on the insurance market and we will talk to eric dinallo, the former new york insurance superintendent. >> my name is allen shortal founder of this corporation. if the fiscal cliff doesn't get resolved no question the u.s. economy will go into recession. we closed down our manufacturing in china and relocated it in the usa. for other companies to follow our lead, they need to trust our leaders in washington will actually lead. think outside the box, great incentive for businesses to invest in the u.s. economy. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could
it for the environment. in part. elizabeth prann is live with more. tell us about the tree elves. can you call them this. >> reporter: we can, they are giving families one less thing to worry about this holiday season, these brothers are known as the kick of pop in the smerp months and sell popular frozen popcicles across atlanta and this southeast end and, now are delivering small, medium or large trees with or without lights and after that pick up the tree and donate them to parks, schools and churches and if you want to you can keep it. customers say it has been a weight lifted off their shoulders during the holiday season and it is eco-friendly, too. >> makes us feel good to support a local business such as the tree elves. rather than go and cut one down or go to home depot and purchase one like we have done in the past. we legislative the idea of supporting tree elves be a supporting king of pops, which we're a big fan of, getting a tree that is sustainable and will be replanted. >> reporter: they have 200 trees and sold out almost immediately and next year will have more trees and more varieties.
up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for me and less tax revenue for the government. i want to urge congress and senators to vote for keeping our tax cuts in place, especially for the middle class and pushing our fiscal crisis to a balanced approach. go ahead and eliminate those tax cuts for the wealthiest individuals. if we all look at it and tried to consider what was going to work for the best, we needed to look at consumer demand. consumer demand is in the 98% of us who are out there driving the economy. the economy require strong consumer sentiment and strong business. i am urging congress to take action. stop playing games. let's move on. thank you. [applause] >> thank you so much, bob. it's a wonderful to have a sensible message from a a small business who really knows what makes our country work. now, i am honored to introduce to you stu and theresa. the mother of three in maryland and will talk to us about the reality she experiences both house and mother but also wor
investors to market and be successful. so what do you do in an environment like this? every individual ought to have a plan. they ought to have a place they're trying to get to. if they're not there now then they ought to have a second plan for how long it takes them to get there, and under what conditions. don't do anything precipitously. individual investors have a knack for making decisions about investing in asset classes at exactly the wrong time. they need to be disciplined. >> all right. balance is another word that sort of irritates me, because when i hear democrats use balance it means higher taxes, when i hear republicans use balance, it means more spending cuts. when you say we need a balanced approach long-term, what are you talking about? >> well, actually, this, i think, is something that investors need to think about. and there are a couple of very smart people writing about the issue. i would say jeremy grantham. but the whole are we coming to the end of an era. in fact i think one of our guests today wrote a piece on this. the end of the era where we could count on 3% averag
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)